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a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. -- unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. to follow up on the fiscal cliff. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage of government spending is more than its should be related to total gdp. if there is an easier for millet in the history of economics that -- formula ever in the history of america -- economics that more american energy equals more american jobs, i don't know what it is. it is all the jobs you have if you of a reliable supply of energy. the front page of the "the wall street journal" indicates a difficulty of connecting this cheap product we have in natural gas. we thought we would run out natural-gas as a country. connecting this cheap product with a more expensive market and getting it overseas. if we could become energy s
be done without destroying the economy, but you are right. they have to do some serious spending cutting. hell, 20% of gdp is too high. 1% is where we ought to be. i got to get out of here. the producers are in my ears. many thanks to you all. we appreciate it very much. >>> now the next question is, will reducing the tax detux for charitable giving really hurt america's charities? you may be surprised about what i'm going to say about this, and the facts back me up. get ready for a debate, because free market capitalism is the best path to prosperity. people don't make charities just because of tax considerations. i'm larry kudlow. they have a heart, and that heart is what driving them to be beneficial. [ male announcer ] if you suffer from heartburn 2 or more days a week, why use temporary treatments when you can prevent the acid that's causing it with prevacid24hr. with one pill prevacid24hr works at the source to prevent the acid that causes frequent heartburn all day and all night. and with new prevacid24hr perks, you can earn rewards from dinner deals to music downloads for purchas
the global economy is in trouble when even taco bell and kfc have trouble making money, right? shares of their parent company yum! brands dove nearly 10% today. the company warned fourth quarter sales in china, their single best market, would likely slide. >>> u.s. consumer spending fell for the first time since may. the 0.2% decline in october partially being blamed on the impact of superstorm sandy. why not. >>> starting off tonight, taxes are the talk of the town and have been for daze. seems like much of the conversation is focused on the wealthy to get them to pay more. a new study by the tax foundation flips the argument over who really is paying their fair share on its head. the numbers show tax rate paid by individuals in income top 1%, was 23%. all filers in bottom 50%. paid 2%. that is 10 times more. joining me scott hodge. from tax foundation. we have also the founder. sqm management. thanks for joining us. scott, i want to start with you since the numbers are manying from your foundation. what is the average takes rate for our viewers and why did you decide to isolate this
that marie solving insolvent firms easier. crucial agreement for restructuring the economy in this transition period as resources must shift from unproductive to productive activities. it is the latter that create jobs. this reallocation process, though sometimes painful in the short run, i'll say always painful in the short run, carries the seed of future prosperity. a growing body of knowledge shows that by increasing the ability of the economy to adjust so that factors can be reallocated to the most competitive firms, aggregate labor productivity can increase substantially. some studies indicate a gain of as much as 20 force 30%. the current focus on competitiveness in france leading towards an institutional and fiscal set up that can support firms investment in innovation is therefore a welcome step in the right direction. another important aspect is the growth and competitiveness enhancing potential of further market integration in europe. one example is a very recent study which finds that applying the eu patent would raise the gains for european firms from patent and inventions by 60%.
and the demand for oil -- actually, and the demand for oil continues to decline based on fuel economy standards and other reasons. and yet, with this revolution we still continue to have a problem. and i think the report that we're releasing today, the national strategy for energy security and its subtitle really says it all -- harnessing american resources innovation. and the first point is, how do we leverage this abundance we have in the united states to our maximum benefit? at a time when washington is talking about our fiscal crisis i'd say that the relationship of our oil needs to this crisis itself are close. it might not solve our fiscal crisis but clearly it's a necessary ingredient. every recession in the history of the united states in moden times has been preceded by or happening concurrent with an oil price spike. if we don't have continued growth we can cut all we want and raise revenue all we want, but we'll never find a way to solve our fiscal troubles. and i think this report really looks at how do we leverage this great abundance, this great blessing in the united states, both
for regional power. israel has the most powerful economy and military, but lacks political power for obvious reasons. turkey has economic and military power, but it also has growing regional clout. egypt is the natural leader of the arab world but it's not in a position to dominate. its economy is shambles, its military is second rate. the public opposition has been reassuring. the middle east is a complex region that is changing fast. grand generalizations about it are likely to be undone by events. but it is a more vibrant, energetic, open, even democratic place than the middle east a generation ago. for more, read my column in this week's "time" magazine. let's get started. >>> it was a week filled with tension and violence in egypt. there were mass protests after morsi issued a decree neutering the judiciary. there were demonstrations in his favor, and a constitution was drafted that spurred protest on the street. what to make of it all? two of my favorite scholars are with me. welcome, guys. conventional wisdom is this is a power grab by morsi. is that accurate? >> his dclaration gave h
that create the salaries and bowed to the point you're making in the importance of the economy. is it in their economic interests to avoid a vacuum? >> first of all, as you know, we signed not only the oslo accords, but also the peace accords. there is a mechanism, how to collect money for debt. today it is our biggest problem, outstanding debt to the electricity company. about 700 million shekels. those are very serious troubles come a very serious -- troubles, very serious problems. we have international obligations. this is in clear opposition to their obligations, to their signature on the oslo peace accord. we do not need to pay for their electricity. we paid for the palestinians, and mahmoud abbas bought a new jet for $53 million. the prime minister of israel does not have his jet, but not with the boss has his jet -- mahmoud abbas has his jet that he bought three months ago. our problem today with the palestinians is not to help them, not to develop their economy, but to deal with corruption in their ministration. we draw our conclusions in this situation as we have toda
and it actually doesn't make sense for the economy overall because middle income families drive the economy more than 80% of the economic activity of consumer spending is generated from people making less than 150, not 250. so we need to have middle income families have that security and then we can talk about the top 2%. >> the president is sitting down, as we speak, with six governors from both sides of the aisle. >> right. >> we're getting first pictures in of that meeting. as we wait to hear what comes from this, is it time for the president to make speaker boehner an offer that he just can't refuse, one that both sides are going to look at as serious? what harry reid is saying a what the gop came back is a nonstarter. john boehner said over the weekend we are nowhere on this. it's a nonstarter plan and i'll raise you with a nonstarter plan? >> i do think that at this stage sometimes the coverage of the back and forth doesn't really indicate to americans what's really happening. there's going to be a the lo of back and forth. i think it's still relatively early because you have two proposals
to be remembered that push the country back into recession. >> it is not leaving a strong economy, it is transforming the economy into a your -- european socialist. connell: thank you, monica. >> thank you. connell: we do have real numbers on the economy to talk about. today, we learned consumer spending is down for the month of october. not to worry says stuart hoffman. he joins us from pittsburgh. >> it is a deal when consumer spending falls. we should put it in context. in july, august and september contributors had a pretty good rebound. as you said, some of the hurricane sandy koufax did affect this number we will find out on monday whether the sales came back when they announced november numbers. if you average this out, we saw, even in our company, a decline in sales of our merchant services. we have seen more of a return to normal and i was encouraged, but i guess it is now black thursday to cyber monday sales look pretty good. connell: everyone says, all right, well, what if we do not get there in terms of this washington self that monica was just talking about and we do
market. it is just going to affect the economy the same as gas prices or food prices going up on the poor and middle class. life will go on. just like life has gone on for the rest of the united states of america. but right now, i think the state of politics is very sad because they're seen -- there seems to be more of a game to be played and positions, one party having the upper hand over the other. not much is going to get done. and you have too many extremes on each side to make things a lot more difficult to run. and it makes it difficult on the president as well. i'm optimistic that the president got reelected, but pessimistic on anything really changing. have leased, anytime soon. -- at least, any time soon. host: and talking about actual change, if there will be a difference on january 1st or otherwise, in terms of taxes, politics, the fiscal cliff, john mckinnon, are any of these expiring? as part of our fiscal cliff series, we're looking at the bush tax cuts that are set to expire unless congress acts, and we are looking at spending cuts. our deductions on the chopping block unle
to do or turn back the clock and return to the politics of old. >> translator: i will bring the economy out of deflation, correct the high yen, lead economic growth, enrich people's lives, and recover an economy where young people don't have to worry about finding jobs. i'll strengthen social security and will promote the reconstruction of the disaster-hit northeast. we'll aim to take back power by winning a majority along with the new komeito party. >> candidates from the following parties are also running -- tomorrow party, new komeito, restoration party, japanese communist party, your party, social democratic party. new party daichi, people's new party, new party nippon, and new renaissance party. candidates are trying to win one of the 480 seats in the lower house. there are 300 single-seat districts. parties win a number of the other 180 seats depending on how much of the proportional representation vote they capture. 1,294 candidates filed to run in the single-seat constituencies. and 1,001 candidates are running for seats in the proportional representation system. they'll share t
that's what he's trying to do. it's hard to see where the upside is for the president if the economy slips into recession, talking about 2013 having no growth would be horrible. >> yeah, so, it's a little hard to see what the game is. as kim was mentioning, the president wants these tax increases. it seems to me we're going to go through this sort of scorpion dance the rest of the year. what did the president campaign on? what was the one thing, i think most people would say he campaigned on, that's raising tax rates on the wealthiest, the two top rates, that's the thing i think is on the table and-- >>, but the republicans put that on the table. >> and the republicans put that on the table the a through deductions and-- >> yeah. but they're willing to put that on the table. the question is, what does the president then give republicans in return, if anything? >> well, i think that's what the republicans position should be. say we have committed what you campaigned on. if you're not willing to talk about reducing spending, they are we're not going to be able to do a deal with you. an
, people. i hope you're not either. coming up tomorrow, what was once a dark spot in the economy is becoming the shining star in the recovery. why the quick turn around? that's all for on the. thanks for joining us. have a great night. see you right back here tomorrow. ♪ lew: good evening, everybody. u.s. foreign policy in the middle east in question at this hour. violence spiring out of control in syria after 20 months of civil unrest and the deaths of at least 40,000 murdered civilians at the hands of their own government. united states and nato agreeing to deploy patriot weapons and to thwart an aso-called by assad. the missile systems to be positioned near the syria. his staff denies that and estimates if they were deploy troops, it requires 75,000 of the troops in a full ground invasion in order to seize the chemical weapon stockpile. fox news confirming they were not ordered to draft the consideration of such a mission. secretary of state clinton is nonetheless talking very tough calling for assad to step down as the obama administration has done for the past 15 months, b
. so if you look at the other trends for the economy, it's still the same of steady slow appreciation and that there really i don't believe is any effect from the supposed anxiety about the fiscal cliff. i think people know there will be some type of resolution. we didn't know the details or when. but companies are still investing the way they would normally do and they're not stopping because of -- >> that doesn't make us quake a bit about the jobs report later this will week and what that does for investors' nerves? >> we know it will be worse than it would have been because of super storm sandy. so you didn't know how much it was to do with that and how much was the economy. so it will be a bit of a wash in terms of reading the tea leaves for the u.s. >> so the growth picture for the u.s., we sort of 1%, 2%, depending on what happens with the fiscal cliff. what do you think, 2.5%? >> yeah, i think we should be 2.5% to 3% by the end of next year. >> which might be a slightly better outturn. china seems to be back on track. is there anything in europe -- what's the tail risk at the m
of the biggest thing is that is killing the economy is something so big you got to say to yourself how come they can't take a little bit less to back up on its seat? >> guest: i am going to disagree with you a little bit. if you look at the percentage of investment, the exploration production of energy is very heavily involved, it is a very expensive item, and their profits are five to 8% on what they actually invest. microsoft and intel are much more profitable and they pay less in taxes than the percentage of the total revenue. so, people always focus on the gas prices. look at your heating bill. the natural gas movement brought down the price of natural gas about 80% of what we produce in terms of my state. it's about a quarter of what it was three years ago. that isn't always a good deal for the american people. it's actually bringing the industry back. this industry which is often vilified quite frankly is the one that is generating more jobs, more income, more opportunity than almost any other sector and it isn't as profitable as the high-tech. >> host: nelson in colorado springs. >>
are willing to make sure we don't go over this fiscal cliff but at the same time don't harm this economy. what has to happen here if the president shows a little leadership we are willing to stay in the room and stay here and we are willing to get this done. that's why you saw a proposal that is raoeubl reasonable that meets his criteria. >> reporter: steny hoyer said in the next few days we will see substantive movement in private to get this done. jenna: we'll continue to watch the play-by-play, mike, thank you. jon: right now we are continuing to await a speech by former president george w. bush, the speakers are taking to the podium there to get ready to introduce the former president. he is set to address a conference there in dallas, where he will spotlight the positive impact of immigration on u.s. economic growth. this as the g.o.p. looks to attract more hiss to the party. meantime mr. bush's father, former president george h.w. bush is spending another day in the hospital being treated for bronchitis and a lingering cough. we told you about that last week when we first found out that
economy. >> they could play havoc with the world economy. i think you would see a wave of terror across the region, potentially even here at home. i don't think, just for your personal, as per personal opinion, i don't think they would try to block the persian gulf because that would cut their own throats, but i would not be surprised to see them attack the oil facilities of other countries on the periphery of the gulf. and to do other things that would drive the price of oil through the roof but i think -- and i think you would see them behave in a very different way in both iraq and afghanistan. >> rose: based on everything you know, do you believe that they will respond to the economic embargo, the economic sanctions if we turn that screw as hard as we possibly can? >> i don't think the government will, if there is one thing that the iranians, saddam hussein, the north koreans and bashar al-assad all have in common is they don't care how many other people get killed. >> rose: even their own people? >> it is what happens to them that matters. so the question is, do those, can the sanc
has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: neither side showed signs of budging today as the nation edged closer toward a so- called fiscal cliff that could raise taxes by year's end. we begin with a report from newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top two percent go up. we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: in his first interview since the election, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the
's credibility, and it's important for america's economy and economic growth. that plan has to be balanced and that means significant revenues, and it has to go around. typically that means the wealthy and well off have to pay their fair share as well. again, these are not new issues. they are ones that were debated. they came up in every debate. even foreign policy debate. and so we think that the american people are on the side of the president and democrats. that is not to say -- [inaudible] we want to remind everyone that there's already been a trillion dollars, over a trillion dollars in spending cuts. and so that is a significant part of this debate, because it happened last year. but just because washington has a short memory doesn't mean we all should have one. and that there's already been sacrifice on behalf of through those discretionary cuts. we are particularly excited doing a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we talked about medical savings through the programs, address rising national expenditure. will have more to say on taxes, but we are ecstatic to have senator durbin here
a trillion dollars next year, there is more and more money on the sidelines in this economy. which means there are even more jobs that won't get created. that means economic growth will even decrease more. so, the president's got to wake up an realize he owns this economy. it is not in his political benefit to do this brinkmanship. jon: debbie, my understanding that the most to everybody agrees that the big drivers of government spending are entitlement programs like social security and medicare and medicaid. why not talk about reducing the expenditures there somehow? >> i want to say several things. one of the things got to do stop taking cheap shots. the secretary of treasury is one of the most serious people in this government. has the trust of the president and that is who the president is sending in here. let's stop taking these cheap shots. that is the kind of stuff we have to stop doing. you are right, this uncertainty is hurting the economy and putting money on the sideline, why we have to solve it. we need to walk into a room and put everything on the table. social security and
. whether it's the best solutioner to the economy is an entirely different story. this is a political and ideological argument and we'll see who wins. martha: there is a couple ways this could go. one is to land in the middle. you have $800 billion and $1.6 trillion. the other is for one side to say no deal. we'll let you go over the fiscal cliff and we'll see what happens. >> reporter: at the last minute i think there will be a deal. i think republicans will retreat and say okay, you can have higher tax rates but only on people making a half million dollars a year. the president will say, okay, but we'll only discuss -- we'll think about, we'll promise spending cuts in the future. it will be a way of kicking the can down the road. martha: charles krauthammer have a will the more leverage than republicans realize. the president does not want us to go into a recession. we'll talk about that coming up. bill: democrats are all about tax hike and republicans argue massive spending programs like medicare and social security must be dealt with in any kind of deal if you want to bring count
care? >> well, we should care because the tax on capital has a major impact on the economy overall, on productivity growth and, therefore, on standards of living. the way that you have a more prosperous economy, is you need to have incentive to encourage capital formation, to encourage investment, to increase worker productivity -- megyn: what are people going to do with their money? so if i had otherwise invested in stocks and gotten dividends, but now -- because i like getting 15% taxes as opposed to, you know, 40% taxes on them -- what am i going to do with my money now instead of invest it in stocks? >> well, on the margin a lot of people will choose consumption. if you can spend your money and enjoy it today versus having more in the future, anytime you reduce the return on investment, you give people more of an incentive to say, the heck with it -- megyn: well, isn't that good for the economy, consumption? >> well, i don't think so. we've got a real problem with declining business investment, and if you don't have expansion on the supply side, it's hard to have the productivi
for the economy. that money should be invested. you are hearing, though, from the white house, we have already put in place a trillion dollars of cuts. we have something on the table. we are the republican proposals. we are talking politics in that nobody wants to go first and really lay out what they are about for fear that there will be a tremendous political consequence on things like cuts to medicare. lori: those cuts, as you know, nearly not enough. the second quarter gdp reading extremely disappointed. let's just call a spade a spade. we know hurricane sandy will shave another point or so off of growth. >> i think it is. that is why despite all of this, what i think of as process, it is a lot of posturing. it is a lot of politicking. people still remain convinced that these guys cannot be serious. they cannot be serious about pushing us off the fiscal cliff because it will have bad responses to republicans. the obama people will be able to say you gave away the ability to keep taxes down on 98% of americans. and for the president, the idea that he would allow the taxes to go up, again, on ap
're going to talk about the fiscal cliff, we're going to talk about the global economy. we're going to talk about the civil war in syria. we'll talk about the royal baby coming soon. first we want to get right to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medica
or programming computers or designing aircraft, we have needs across all sectors of our economy. not -- yes, in stem, but not just in stem. so we are asked to choose. asked to choose between people with graduate degree who we want to keep here in science, technology, engineering, and math. in many cases, if they're not allowed to stay, they will have to return to other countries and the jobs will follow them, costing our country jobs. choose between them and allowing people here from countries other than mexico, india, and china. some of whom are high skilled, some of whom are low skilled, divorce group across the board and looking back at many of our own forebears, certainly mine mitigating circumstance family came to this country in the late 19th century and early 20th century, 1890's, 1905. they didn't have master's degrees they zrntpampede's they didn't have college degrees. and that's the case for many of our forebears. and here today their great grandson sits as a member of congress. and had a program then existed whereby they could arrive nellliss island and be here, i wouldn't be he
where substantively republicans believe in things and think certain things are better for the economy and the country, they will be in a weaker position to achieve any of those things. but they have to take into the consideration the idea that everybody's taxes will go up january 1st if there is no deal. it is not going to be all on the president's shoulders. in fact most of might be on theirs temporarily and for good. they have to decide what is the better position. and you know, will the president and the democrats offer them something that they really should take, significant spending cuts? some kind of significant entitlement reform? those are kind of things republicans have been after for a long time. even though there would be grumbling about tax increases on certain income level, that is something they could take home and really savor. this depends where it goes, the brinkmanship continues. david drucker from "roll call." thank you. >> thanks a lot. jenna: well now we turnover seas where we have some new information today on what some say could really be a turning point in the
small economy to the second largest in the world. and 3, primacy of the party with its 80 million members and 3000 outposts in the world. now you have xi jinping rising to power. he has been given the party mantle and soon the military and the presidency. before him will be new questions much different from the ones that deng xiaoping was responsible for acting upon. before xi jinping will be questions like, is china more repressive at home today than in earlier years. is china more nationalistic in its economic practices, but jiggly those among the enterprises? has china become more assertive internationally? i would argue east of these questions carried fairly profound rule of law implications. as xi jinping rises to take the top position in china and wrestles with new challenges and attempts to answer any questions, i would argue that many of them are based in basic rule of law doctorate -- doctrine. the most important steps ahead for china will be around bolstering the rule of law. the implications are profound for expanding civil society, for human rights, for addressing the
wealthy americans are the ones who are creating the jobs and helping to turn this economy around. that remains the big sticking point. those bush era tax cuts, white house saying it should be extended for middle class americans but not for those upper income americans, carol. >> how seriously should we take these negotiations? both sides are negotiating in public, not the greatest way to negotiate in the world, right? >> reporter: right. you sort of have to take it based on the information they give you. there's a lot that goes on behind the scenes. we've seen this play out over the last four years where both sides will sort of throw these sharp elbows publicly, but then they do hammer something out. we do have to take it seriously. you have to get a sense that both sides understand the serious nature of this fiscal cliff and they do want a deal to get done. so they are looking for ways to find some kind of agreement. they are looking at outside groups today as well. the president will meet with half a dozen governors, arkansas, minnesota, utah, wisconsin, republican governor fro
and is fair. that would be good for businesses, for our economy, for future generations, and i believe both parties can and will work together in the coming weeks to get that done. we know how that gets done. we're going to have to raise a little more revenue. we have to cut spending we don't need. and if we combine those two things, we can create a path where america's paying its bills while still being able to make investments in the things we need to grow like education and infrastructure. we know how to do that but in washington nothing's easy so there's going to be prolonged negotiations and all of us are going to have to get out of our comfort zones to make that happen. i'm willing to do that. i'm hopeful that enough members of congress in both parties are willing to do that, as well. we can solve these problems, but where the clock is really ticking right now is on middle class taxes. at the end of the year, middle class taxes currently in place are set to expire, middle class tax cuts surge in place are set to expire. there are two things that can happen. if conditioning does nothin
'll be impacted, won't be able to put more money into the economy, won't be able to help turn the economy around. so that really is sort of the big sticking point. the white house refusing to budge from it at this point. we'll see where it goes in the next coming days. >> topic two, that is that the president is meeting with the leaders of the national governors association. i have the lineup here. a lot of people haven't heard of some of those folks. jack markell, dayton, beebe, gary her bet of utah, mary fallin of oklahoma and wisconsin's goff scott walker who i think a lot of people are familiar with. the question is why are they there, what do they want and why wh -- what do they want to say? >> a lot of reasons. the president wants to make his case to them, and then in turn hopefully that they will go up on capitol hill. of course, some of them will be meeting with house speaker john boehner and senate majority leader harry reid. so the hope is they will put pressure on their lawmakers from their states to get a deal done. but also this is a chance for these governors to talk about the fact
. again, the economy is doing a little better. the unemployment numbers have been a little better, but what's the impact? >> 2 million people -- >> 2 million would lose. >> -- would lose income. here's the thing. there's a lot of talk of these people are looking or not looking for jobs, they're just taking this check. that's not the case. there's only one job for every three folks looking for a job. so there literally is not a job available for two of those people. so they have this income, unemployment insurance which keeps them in the economy, a functioning part of the economy, so they can spend the money. so the economic policy institute went ahead and extrapolated. if you were to keep this $30 billion cost of extended unemployment insurance, actually, that will pump another $15 billion to $18 billion into the economy because these folks are spending money. and that's what fuels our economy. >> some of the people who argue that we should go off the fiscal cliff, that it will push them to negotiate a sort of more thoughtful deal -- >> right. >> -- they say that it's not a fiscal
cut down the economy. our friend, not warren buffett but the other guy. a great conversation, ralph nader has been by. years ago -- >> what did he learn from his -- >> did me a favor of not bothering me with his problems which was great that spin too much time trying to make money. >> a useful friends with him? >> i never said anything about him. >> as we go, you have an unusual hobby. you, something unusual. >> i have a collection of backers. also have a collection of airsickness bags. one thing i do ask people who come to the meeting, very helpful if you are traveling, you have an airsickness bag which the free present government afghanistan air sickness bag, so it is a great collection and somebody mentioned years ago in a profile starting in an e-mail, this is -- and odd quirky thing i did. >> what is the mood at the meeting going to be? >> people are very optimistic. people were disappointed because we didn't have the house senate president and then people thought we were going to get the president in the senate and stock didn't go up. we elected a house stronger than the last
the summer months where he focused on obama and the economy. i want to talk about, because i can't resist it, it's almost 2013. i think we're well within the bounds. the virginia governor's race. bill bolling, the lieutenant governor, dropped out in twain to make way for bob mcdonnell, currently the governor, dropped out again this week to make way for state attorney jgeneral ken cucinell cucinelli. you have the best friend of bill clinton terry mcauliffe as the democratic nominee. some people are painting this as a tea party against the clintons in mcauliffe. things can still happen. it looks like a fascinating race. >> chris, as you know, political reporters, we only have two gubernatorial races to cover. we give a lot of attention to virginia and new jersey. what's fascinating about virginia, since i've been covering politics on the national stage, the off-year election has proved to be a template if that party that's out of power wins. 2005, tim kaine ends up running a race, appealing to independents, sfresing his religious faith. actually kind of having a very soft appeal to a lot of fo
paid down and start growing the economy again. that's not unusual or new to any of us. nobody in the country. so i think the president is sticking to what he said throughout the campaign and as i said 3 million more people voted for him than voted for the other guy. >> with that said, on taxes, if there's any chance on your side, is there any chance on your side to come down to the form of a smaller tax hike on incomes above $250,000 or would you consider keeping rate it is same at $250,000 and raising them only on higher incomes, say half a million or $1 million a year? >> i think it's all part of the negotiations. we know where the president is and that is 250,000. but there are a lot of democrats who voiced back before the campaign 500,000, some say even a million. all of that is going to be negotiated. the president wants 250. if mr. boehner wants to come and offer something different, i'm sure he will do that. but the president stands at 250. which is below even where i was but he won the election. so i'm going to respond to the president though it's a number diffent from
our economy. >> reporter: republicans led by house speaker john boehner says he should quit campaigning and take care of the business at hand. republicans say they are willing to consider raising more revenue but they want to see spending cuts to go along with it. >> we need to hear they are willing to make spending cuts now, not promises of spending cuts sometime if the future. to me the tidal waves that are coming at us is social security and medicare and the new health care law. >> reporter: now house democratic leader nancy pelosi is calling the speakers to bring the tax to the floor by tuesday or she will try to force a vote. boehner is not likely to buckle under pressure so it seems like a standoff. >> gregg: sfuaf. what a surprise? they want to resolve this fiscal crisis or lack in his real compromise. john boehner is leading an attack on the lack of progress. >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. it was not a serious proposal. so right now we're almost nowhere. >> gregg: almost nowhere. how about that? staff writer for roll call joins us live. the preside
are an economy that is driven by consumer demand. i cannot think of anything that would be more guaranteed to put the economy in a recession than increasing the price of all goods and services that we purchase by 20-25%. >> host: we'll give brad on twitter the last word here. he says negotiate and simplify, let the republicans lower taxes and get rid of the amt. john buckley, thank you for your help this morning in helping us try to understand the alternative minimum tax, appreciate it. >> guest: okay, good. >> in a few moments, a discussion of house spending cuts in the so-called fiscal cliff. in a little less than an hour, more about the fiscal cliff with republican representative tom cole from oklahoma. then the head of fema testifies on capitol hill about the government's response to hurricane sandy. and later, senate debate on the u.n. treaty for the disabled. ♪ ♪ >> this weekend on c-span3's american history tv, follow harry truman easeleddest grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the bombing of the city in 1945. >> you know, everybody has their own view what happened, and
they were in 1980 or 1950, the question is given the world today and the other economies do we have a competitive tax system and i think our slow going economy under president obama says we don't. >> the new york times though makes a mention of, just a sort of a passing mention in this massive article, by the way, about the need to cut spending like one or two sentences about the need-- >> and i think that milton freedman brought us, that spending is really the tax bill. it's just delayed. so, every toll the government spends eventually they're going to have to take it from someone, either in taxes or in inflation, so, this is why you're seeing a lack of business investment is because this massive spending and huge debt tells every business owner, every investor, big tax are are coming to eventually pay for this. >> what was the point of the piece? i know there's hand wringing out there, maybe the folks on the right say under obama our taxes have gone up and we may more in taxes than we've ever paid and attempt to say, we're not-- >> this is long-term by the president and his allies
. >> the concern people have is the world economy is in a very fragile state right now. i don't have to say what the problems of the eurozone have, they're very manifest. but the global economy as a whole, there's a lack of confidence, a worry about where it's going. so if you in america, and people have a lot of confidence in america in this regard, if you can sort out this issue, then even though that doesn't sort out all the problems of the american or global economy, it would be a big boost and give people a sense of confidence that there was -- you guys have got your act together. the decisions were being taken, and i think it will be good for you and good for us. so i hope you do it. i believe you will. i know right now there's bound to be tough negotiations. the president has been re-elected and i think that gives the situation its own special momentum. i hope you resolve it and then we're going to have to take some tough decisions over our way, too. >> very quickly. there was a cute video of hillary clinton here in washington over the weekend, and it had a clip from you in there. i'll pl
't know, feeling better and so much of this is about how we feel about the economy. >> oh, yeah. that's right. investors may not like it, but consumers love it. their confidence, the highest level in many, many months. still below 90, which is really the point at which you see a really strong and robust economy. but the fact that consumer confidence has been doing so much better, it's very important. now, here is possibly a source of their optimism. 20% of consumers expect more jobs in the next six months and that would be a cause for much optimism. >> shepard: yes, it would. the fears about europe's debt crisis clearly eased a bit 'cause there is another deal to provide aid to greece. >> more money for greece, $57 billion. it took three weeks to come to this conclusion for european and global leaders to say hey, we'll give you the money. it will come in four installments and if they didn't get this, they would be in bankruptcy. as you know, that would be bad for the entire e.u. that country, greece, has an unemployment rate of 25%. 25. >> shepard: big number. >> it's a very big numbe
the fiscal cliff will not just impact the national economy but have a lot of impact on state and local economies, as well, and their state budgets, et cetera. the president, though, is standing firm. and jake carney saying unless the republicans give in on tax rates and raise the bush tax rates on the rich, there is no deal and the president is willing to go off the cliff. they hammered speaker boehner's proposal. >> we don't know who pays. we don't know what we are talking about in terms actual legislation to increase revenues it is magic beans and fairy dust. >>reporter: it doesn't sound like they are ready for a compromise. he said they do not take speaker boehner's proposal seriously enough to offer a counterpropsal so the white house believes the ball is still in the republicans' court. >>shepard: but speaker boehner has moved, if shiply and if for the first time in public but he has moved. >>reporter: he has. he is not willing yet, not yet, anyway, willing to raise tax rates. in speaker boehner's proposal he put revenue, tax revenue of $800 billion on the table. you her the white
got to where we are today. he kind of explained a little bit about his vision for the economy and where he thinks it is going. and thoughts about what is top of mind for us about the economy. melissa: so what did you say and did you feel like he listened to you and was going to take action based on that? >> yeah. absolutely. it was really, he had a lot of his top administration there. vice president biden was there as well. they were all really kind of into everything we're saying. very actionable. it was fun to see back and forth t wasn't just him listening to 15 different people. he was engaged and asked questions. melissa: what did you ask him to do specifically? what did you say would help your business? >> one thing that helped us a lot incentives for small businesses to hire. particularly for us we were able to use the jobs now program out in the bay area to get some of our first staff on board. it was to provide a story and face to impact some of these programs that can incentivize hiring for small businesses had. we wouldn't be here without it. melissa: so you got mone
-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. jon: fox news alert for you now. we are awaiting remarks from president obama. he is pushing his plan to try to avoid the year-end fiscal cliff. this speech comes ahead of a meeting between the president and business leaders later today discussing actions the white house says are aimed at growing the economy and finding a quote, balanced approach to reducing the nation's deficit. let's bring in our panel. mary katharine ham editor-at-large of hot air.com and fox news contributor. peter mirijanian former advisor to the clinton-gore and gore-lieberman campaigns. when the president arrives at the white house to speak, he will have people behind him, ordinary americans who reached out to the white house and want their $2,000 middle class tax cut preserved. republicans are saying this is essentially a campaign stunt, a campaign appearance kind of event of the he won the election. he should get on the business of governing. what do you say? >> well, one quick observation, jon. i think what you're seeing, what i think is i
that exploded in the open. saying that it reads like a democratic wish-list and could plunge the economy back into recession. oh joy. welcome here. i'm bill hemmer. live in "america's newsroom.". martha: good morning, bill. bill: we'll find the silver lining in this, aren't we? martha: we are. bill: that is our quest. martha: i'm martha maccallum. here are the basics when they put forth through tim geithner yesterday from the president. 1.6 trillion in new taxes. that is the opening part of the deal. 50 billion in new stimulus spending. we already had a lot of backlash in stimulus in previous packages. this is interesting element here. new executive power to raise the debt limit. that is what caused so many of these discussions because they bump up against the debt limit and not be able to go back this. there is executive power plea to be able to do that without going back to confess. republicans are saying where is the balance? where is the spending cut side of the equation. the president said he wanted it to be a balanced deal. watch. melissa: so right now all eyes are on the white house. t
sounds] >> if the president really wants to avoid sending the economy over the fiscal cliff he's done nothing to demonstrate it. >> we don't know who pays. we don't know what we're talking about in terms of actual legislation to increase revenues it's magic beans and fairy dust. [farting sounds] >> stephanie: all right. >> fairy dust goes very well with bourbon. >> stephanie: republicans were quick to say that boehner's plan was attracting criticism from the right particularly from jim demint of south carolina, tea party leader and as such, represented more of a compromise than obama's stance. uh no! nice try. demint said boehner's plan will destroy american jobs and allow politicians in washington to spend more. oh, please we're not falling for this. they think if they criticize the plan, oh, well it must be a good compromise then. nice try! 29 minutes after the hour. spongebob squarepants tom kenny, our buddy our pal next on "the stephanie miller show." you know who's coming on to me now? you know the kind of guys w
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